Business

Grizzly bear kills a biker who was camping in Montana

Authorities claimed a grizzly bear attacked and killed a biker camped in a tiny western Montana town early Tuesday, sparking an extensive hunt for the bruin by wildlife officials and law enforcement personnel who planned to shoot the animal. According to studies, the danger of diseases spreading from wildlife commerce and farmed animals into people should be a significant issue in attempts to avert the next pandemic. To characterize and manage the danger of the next pandemic, researchers have analyzed the hazards of the many methods that disease-causing organisms move from animals to people. In a study published in the journal Biological Reviews, researchers from the University of Cambridge discovered that, while the danger of another pandemic cannot be avoided, systemic changes in the way people interact with animals, in general, might significantly reduce the likelihood. They warn that the dangers are not limited to exotic wild creatures. “There is a natural temptation, particularly in the Western world, to believe that something is unrelated to us. It’s something remote and unusual… something that someone else has been doing,” said the study’s principal author, Dr. Silviu Petrovan, a Cambridge veterinarian and wildlife expert. “I guess what most people have in mind is something considerably more exotic than the venison they purchase in Waitrose – which, of course, is wildlife.” Although eating exotic wild animals is a component, the study discovered that other significant pandemic risk variables include:

  • Wildlife cultivation and commerce.
  • Livestock.
  • International trafficking of exotic animals for pets.
  • Human encroachment on wildlife habitats.Separate

 Research has been conducted to assess this risk, focusing on how viruses transition from animals to humans. According to the research done by experts from The Nature Conservancy and the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and Environment (ATREE) in India, most new diseases are more likely to be viral with origins in mammal species.

Topics