Food

In 2022, ten Indian tastemakers anticipate the future of food

In 2022, ten Indian tastemakers anticipate the future of food
In 2022, ten Indian tastemakers anticipate the future of food

Seed milk, sourdough, the rise and rise of the cloud kitchen, smaller menus, and plant “meats” are just a few of the culinary trends that have dominated and will continue to dominate in the coming years. Newer styles have evolved to seize dominion over our kitchens and dining tables as they spill over into 2022. We asked ten tastemakers from various sectors of the food business to give their predictions for the next year.

Food and technology will eventually come together.

“As we emerged from several lockdowns over the previous two years, the restaurant industry concentrated on adjusting and reorganizing.” In the following year, I anticipate us bolstering what we’ve created, particularly in terms of service digitalization. It will all revolve around technology. In food production, ordering, and logistics, there will be a trend toward more sophisticated technologies. The advent of cell-based tastemakers “meat” is just the beginning—apps and bots will be used more for tracking orders, restaurant sanitation, footfall monitoring, and other tasks.”

The importance of fermented Indian food will be highlighted.

“While fermentation has been popular in the culinary world for some time, fermentation in Indian cuisine will gain traction this year.” Fermented Indian delicacies such as dosa, idli, appam, idiyappam, and dhokla, for example, are being redefined in restaurants both in India and overseas. Fermentation is also making an appearance in sweets, such as a Lacto–fermented ice cream with Indian flavors like tamarind, kokum, and buttermilk.”

Desserts on plates will be plenty.

“While a classic dark chocolate loaf cake or a luscious peanut butter cookie will always bring back good memories, more cooks will focus on plated desserts this year.” Classic desserts like tiramisu and apple pie will be reimagined to fill up a plate, similar to the ongoing plated phase in Indian cuisine, where chefs serve their interpretation of a dish by breaking down the components of a dish into several versions.”

Wine-like complexity will be found in Indian coffee.

“The discourse about coffee has progressed beyond the differences between pour-over and drip coffee. The goal this year is for customers to learn about coffee procedures, such as how the bean is treated on the farm. Nuanced techniques like carbonic maceration, which is analogous to winemaking and offers coffee complex flavor characteristics like a hint of bubblegum, are being highlighted.”

The largest environmental trend will be zero-waste delivery materials.

“After COVID upended the traditional F&B paradigm in favor of delivery, packaging will be the next significant development in the sustainability area, with biodegradable and/or multi-use packaging becoming the standard.” Retro leaf bowls, high-tech sugarcane bagasse, areca palm’styrofoam,’ and reusable glass bottles and jars are all examples of the shift away from disposable plasticware.”
The time has come for Indian cheese types to shine.
“An Indian cheese named Brunost earned a silver medal at the World Cheese Awards last year. Indian cheesemakers appear to be on everyone’s radar now that local cheeses are gaining a worldwide reputation. Indian cheeses will be comparable to French and Italian variants in terms of flavor and texture. There’s Zarai from Darima Farms, as well as Bombrie and Tomme de Bombai from The Spotted Cow Fromagerie.”
The superfood of the year will be Indian millet flour.
“To be honest, much of our knowledge about vegan and gluten-free cuisine has originated from the West. While we saw a lot of oat and quinoa flour on our plates in 2020 and 2021, this year’s gluten-free definition is heading closer to home, towards millet flour. To produce everything from cookies, crackers, brownies, and cakes to sourdough bread and pizza bases, bakers will employ more Indian millets, including jowar, buckwheat, rajgira, and ragi flour. They’re less costly, have more nutritious content, and are more environmentally friendly.”
The authored article is written by Darshana Joshi and shared with Prittle Prattle News  exclusively.
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