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‘Real-life Aquaman’ of 2022: A man with disabilities survives at sea after being swept away by a tsunami in Tonga

Folau, the Aquaman, said he swam 7.5 kilometers (4.7 miles) to the main island of Tongatapu, arriving 27 hours later on Sunday night, according to Reuters. Finally, on his ninth attempt, he could latch onto a log. "On the eighth time, I thought, that's it, the next time I go underwater because my arms were the only thing keeping me above water," he told the news agency.

Lisala Folau has been dubbed a “real-life Aquaman” after surviving in the sea for 27 hours after tsunami waves hit his home island of Atata.

Back-to-back volcanic eruptions caused massive damage to the tiny Pacific island of Tonga and severe tsunami waves. Despite all of the loss and devastation, the survival of a differently-abled man in the face of adversity has arisen as a beacon of hope for all. 

Fola has been dubbed a “real-life Aquaman” after surviving in the waters for 27 hours after tsunami waves hit his home island of Atata. After being tossed around in the water by the strong current, he made it to shore, leaving everyone relieved and surprised. 

The eruption in the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai, an underwater volcano, covered miles and miles of land with ash and plumes and swept away people’s homes and holiday resorts throughout the archipelago. However, the 57-year-old Tongan man, a retired carpenter, could use his swimming skills to his advantage.

In the interview with Tongan media agency Broadcom Broadcasting, he recounted his survival story, saying, “I just floated, bashed around by the big waves that kept coming.” Please keep in mind that I am disabled. “I’m unable to walk properly.”
Folau, the aquaman, according to The Age, was alerted to the tsunami by his brother and took refuge in a tree. However, once he landed after the first wave, a more significant wave swept him and his family out to sea.
“It was pitch black, and we couldn’t see each other. “I couldn’t hear my niece calling anymore, but I could hear my son calling,” he explained. The man stated that he did not respond to the calls because he did not want his family members to risk their lives to save him.
Folau, the Aquaman, said he swam 7.5 kilometers (4.7 miles) to the main island of Tongatapu, arriving 27 hours later on Sunday night, according to Reuters. Finally, on his ninth attempt, he could latch onto a log. “On the eighth time, I thought, that’s it, the next time I go underwater because my arms were the only thing keeping me above water,” he told the news agency.
While Flolau has gone viral as Aquaman, he told the news agency that he is unaware of the DC Universe character, played in the films by Jason Momoa.

This release is articulated by Prittle Prattle News in the form of an authored article.

Also read: environmental education, No environmental damage

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